Skip to content
Acoustic to Electri...
 
Notifications
Clear all

Acoustic to Electric...

19 Posts
9 Users
0 Reactions
5,681 Views
(@pyaara_wala)
Eminent Member
Joined: 20 years ago
Posts: 37
Topic starter  

so is a double stop used with one finger or more than one?


   
ReplyQuote
(@musenfreund)
Illustrious Member
Joined: 22 years ago
Posts: 5108
 

It depends. If I'm fretting -- or, to use the other term, stopping -- two strings at the same fret, I use the same finger. If they're at different frets -- say the seventh and sixth or something like that -- I'll use two fingers.

Well we all shine on--like the moon and the stars and the sun.
-- John Lennon


   
ReplyQuote
(@pyaara_wala)
Eminent Member
Joined: 20 years ago
Posts: 37
Topic starter  

but then wouldn't that be a power chord? which strings do you strum? both ones you are fretting, or stopping?


   
ReplyQuote
(@musenfreund)
Illustrious Member
Joined: 22 years ago
Posts: 5108
 

Yes. Absolutely. So far as I know, a power chord played on two strings alone could be called a double stop too.

Here's an official definition:
To produce two tones simultaneously on (a stringed instrument) by stopping two strings with one hand while bowing them with the other.
You can find that definition here: http://education.yahoo.com/reference/dictionary/entries/75/d0357550.html

I think the term is originally a violin term, by the way, but I'm not sure. At any rate, the term "power chord" would give you more information (i.e. play the root and the fifth to get this tone) than the term double stop does. So I think we tend to use the term double stop when a powerchord isn't produced. But as I say, a two string power chord is indeed also a double stop.

Oh, and you strum both strings, yes.

Hope that helps.

Well we all shine on--like the moon and the stars and the sun.
-- John Lennon


   
ReplyQuote
Page 2 / 2