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Confused..Please help

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(@tragedy8)
Active Member
Joined: 12 years ago
Posts: 3
Topic starter  

Hello to everyone and I hope that some of you may take a second to explain as I am confused.

I have always had an interest in spanish guitar and recently suffered a tragedy in my life and would like to learn how to play.
Is spanish guitar synonymous with spanish romance or flamenco? I am referring to guitarists like Segovia and Armik whose music I love. I recently bought a Yamaha flamenco guitar CG172SF. Is this the correct guitar I would need to learn this style of music or would I need a standard classical guitar and not a flamenco? Thank you and look forward to hearing from someone soon.


   
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(@noteboat)
Illustrious Member
Joined: 21 years ago
Posts: 4921
 

"Spanish" guitar can refer to either flamenco, which is the regional music of the Andalusian region - which includes percussion instruments in the form of castanets and the dancer's heels, or to classical guitar, which also originated in Spain.

Amrik is a flamenco guitarist. Segovia was a classical guitarist.

There are slight differences between classical and flamenco guitars. The most important one is the presence of golpeadores on a flamenco guitar - flamenco is a percussive style, and the guitarist strikes the top with the fingertips or thumb... golpeadores are plastic plates, either clear or white, above and below the strings on the top.

Other differences:

- the wood. Flamenco guitars are traditionally made from Spanish cypress for the back and sides; classical guitars usually use rosewood. Flamenco guitars are often cedar topped, while classical guitars often have spruce tops.

- the depth. Flamenco guitars are slightly shallower than classicals.

- the action. Flamenco guitars have a lower action; string buzzing is part of the overall sound

- the tuners. Flamenco guitars traditionally used friction tuners (like violin pegs), but these days most makers use classical tuning machines.

Either style of guitar can be used for either style of music. But lacking golpeadores, you can dent the top of a classical by playing flamenco music (I know, I've done it).

The Yamaha you mentioned is a flamenco guitar, with golpeadores and low action... but with a spruce top and classical tuners. It would be good for learning flamenco. While you CAN learn the classical style on a flamenco guitar, some techniques - especially apoyando, or the "rest stroke", take a pretty deft touch to pull off on a flamenco guitar without noticeable string buzz.

Guitar teacher offering lessons in Plainfield IL


   
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(@tragedy8)
Active Member
Joined: 12 years ago
Posts: 3
Topic starter  

So i am interested in armik's style, should i return my flamenco and acquire a traditional classical/spanish guitar? or can this yamaha bridge me into both spanish guitar and flamenco?


   
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(@noteboat)
Illustrious Member
Joined: 21 years ago
Posts: 4921
 

Amarik's style is flamenco, so I'd keep the guitar.

Guitar teacher offering lessons in Plainfield IL


   
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(@tragedy8)
Active Member
Joined: 12 years ago
Posts: 3
Topic starter  

the flamenco guitars are also smaller. would you recommend starting with the classical because it is larger and wider and therefore easier to play for a beginner? or is the separation of the strings the same with both types?


   
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