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G & C Chords

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(@biker_jim_uk)
Honorable Member
Joined: 16 years ago
Posts: 539
 

tkn_dk, take the '.' off the end of link and it will work


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(@steeder)
Active Member
Joined: 16 years ago
Posts: 17
 

I had the same problem so I did something similar to what others have already mentioned and practiced (over and over and over) a chord progression that had C as a "home base". I play G to C to D to C to Am to C, etc, etc. I try to do that with any chords I am having trouble moving to and it really helps.

Steed


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(@tkn_dk)
Trusted Member
Joined: 16 years ago
Posts: 57
 

tkn_dk, take the '.' off the end of link and it will work

Fixed. :)

All I want is food and creative love.


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(@chuckster)
Prominent Member
Joined: 16 years ago
Posts: 938
 

I'm still very much a noob to this game and can sympathise with the C and G thing. Stick with it - it will come. There isn't a magic formula other than practice.

The C chord now feels so natural my hand automatically froms the C chord on the fret when I pick the guitar up. You have just got to keep at it.

I've nailed the F chord. The B is another matter entirely. I'm going through the same process of trying to crack it as I did with the C and G a couple of months ago. It does take time.

I find the best way to practice chord changes when learning a new song is to make sure that I can play each chord in isolation. I will then play each chord in order as per the song but just with one downward strum before each chord change. I do this slowly at first and gradually increase the speed. Once I am confident I can do the chord changes smoothly I will then concentrate on the strumming pattern. May not be everybodies cup of tea but the system seems to work for me.

HTH

I've had a lot of sobering thoughts in my time.
It was them that turned me to drink.


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(@dylan6776)
Estimable Member
Joined: 16 years ago
Posts: 124
 

I've been playing nearly four years and still, for the life of me, CANNOT play a B chord! I avoid it whenever it crops up in a song (which isn't a good thing). And my barring in general still sucks ! :(

Never assume the other fellow has intelligence equal to yours. He may have more.


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(@mikey)
Reputable Member
Joined: 18 years ago
Posts: 330
 

also I play the G 320033 and I cheat on that by nailing the E and A strings first then a split second later the B and E strings, its easrier than trying the place all four fingers at once.

Nothing wrong with this. You can play the first 3 or 4 strings (EADG) on the down strum while you set your R&P finger on the B&E strings. Then you can play all strings on the second down strum or the just the first couple coming back up on a up strum. These are partial chords that David Hodge talks about in his lessons. You don't have to play all the strings on every strum, the tonality of the chord will be there.

Sometimes I have the same problem with my D chord. My ring finger comes down on the D a little late leaving the open B string in the chord. But since B is part of the D major scale (DEF#GABC#D) you can get a way with it. I guess that would be a D add6 chord DABF#. (Some one correct me if I'm wrong.) No one has complained yet. Except the cat, but she runs anytime I pick up the guitar.

Smart cat.

Mike

Playing an instrument is good for your soul


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(@ghost-rider)
Reputable Member
Joined: 17 years ago
Posts: 274
 

cool. :)

C always gave me concern. It's a fingering across three strings and mute that low e string. Initially tough, but so essential to know.

It will come. Do G-->C---->D It will come. It's necessity that will birth the skill. A song will inspire you to persevere to learn the C (in relation to all else). I smile, because I said the same thing to my guitar teacher about 2 years ago.

cool question.

later,
Ghost

"Colour made the grass less green..." 3000 miles, Tracy Chapman


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(@the-dali)
Noble Member
Joined: 16 years ago
Posts: 1507
 

A great song for practicing the G -> C-> D is Uncle John's Band by the Dead.

My recent guitar teacher has me playing the G with a slightly different fingering than normal which helps in the transition from the G -> C and back. Here it is:

Fingers:
1 – index
2 – middle
3 – ring
4 – pinky

G Chord

E -|-|4|-|-|-
B -|-|-|-|-|-
G -|-|-|-|-|-
D -|-|-|-|-|-
A -|2|-|-|-|-
E -|-|3|-|-|-

C Chord

E -|-|-|-|-|-
B 1|-|-|-|-|-
G -|-|-|-|-|-
D -|2|-|-|-|-
A -|-|4|-|-|-
E -|-|3|-|-|-

This C chord add a “G” root which works well with the G Chord that proceeds it…

Because of the way the G chord is made above, the 1st finger is already near the B string at the 1st fret. Definitely seems easier to me. Of course, I had to re-learn how to form the G chord...

-=- Steve

"If the moon were made of ribs, would you eat it?"


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(@corbind)
Noble Member
Joined: 19 years ago
Posts: 1744
 

I remember how hard it was like it was yesterday. My guitar teacher would get mad at me 'cause I couln't get that and many other chords. It all boils down to time with your fingers on that guitar. Hope you get those chords!

"Nothing...can take the place of persistence. Talent will not; nothing is more common than unsuccessful men with talent. Genius will not; unrewarded genius is almost a proverb. Education will not; the world is full of educated derelicts."


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