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Go back to what you struggled with (Newbies).

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(@markthechuck)
Reputable Member
Joined: 16 years ago
Posts: 169
Topic starter  

To All newbies,

Just a quick note, Remember to go back to the songs that you first struggled with as you never know you may not struggle anymore, On my 2nd or 3rd lesson my Guiter Teacher gave me a song to work on that was full of barr chords and at the time i could not play it at all as i really struggled with barr chords, since then i've gotten better with plenty of practice, i went back to it yesterday and to my Joy i could play it, not all the way through straight away i had to work on it for a while but i got it down in the end, so remember what you struggle with to start off with go back to after a while because your natrual progress will make it eaiser for you to play...Keep Rockin!!! 8)

A knock back is the beginning of a comeback!!!


   
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(@lummoxx)
Trusted Member
Joined: 18 years ago
Posts: 47
 

Rush - Limelight. The chorus.

I still can't play the chorus at speed, but my fingers are at least starting to learn the correct positioning.

8)

------
Lummoxx
-Fender Stratocaster Splatter
-Line6 GuitarPort
-Marshall Half Stack MG100HDFX/MG412 Cab
-Boss "Heavy Metal" HM-2
-Current GAS Pain: WARBEAST!


   
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(@rahul)
Famed Member
Joined: 18 years ago
Posts: 2736
 

I keep playing all those songs which I wanted to play as a newbie.

They are most fun to play. Eg. Country Roads by JD.


   
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(@rparker)
Illustrious Member
Joined: 20 years ago
Posts: 5480
 

Good advice MTC. I tried Sultans Of Swing early on. Darned near lost an eye. As soon as I figured out barre chords, went straight back to it. Other things too, like the rhythm for Down By The River and Ballad Of Curtis Loew got me early on. Always went back and can do them both pretty well now.

Roy
"I wonder if a composer ever intentionally composed a piece that was physically impossible to play and stuck it away to be found years later after his death, knowing it would forever drive perfectionist musicians crazy." - George Carlin


   
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(@mmoncur)
Estimable Member
Joined: 17 years ago
Posts: 168
 

Great advice! Several times I've realized I haven't tried to play a particular song for a long time, and I worry that I've forgotten how to play it. I try it and, surprise, it's way better than before... because I've been practicing other stuff since then. It's a great feeling.


   
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 Ande
(@ande)
Prominent Member
Joined: 17 years ago
Posts: 652
 

Hear Hear!

One of the first songs I attempted was Nothing Ever Happens, by Del Amitri- the strumming pattern, while not exactly complicated, was just too darn fast for me, and I couldn't change chords that quickly. Went back to it a couple of weeks ago- it's actually a really easy song! (Well, now at least. MAny things get easy with a few hundred hours of practice!)

Best,
Ande


   
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(@yashicamat)
Reputable Member
Joined: 17 years ago
Posts: 271
 

My 2p's worth . . . learning the guitar has to be a very unusual skill. I don't think you will necessarily realise your progress unless you force your mind back weeks or months and see how you were, then you really realise!

Far be it for me to be the main speaker on this subject as I'm only 13 months into my playing, but even now I see improvements I didn't realise. Case in point, a solo I hadn't touched for a few months I played again the other day for the first time. Even though I hadn't practiced it as such, I played it so much more fluently, showing that although I wasn't aware of it, my technique was improving.

My suggestion, as this is something I've done, is to video or audio record (video is better as you can see your frustrations!) your playing on a song you find tricky. Practice that song and come back and record yourself again after a few weeks. Compare the two. Then try it with 6 months etc. - it's really quite amazing the differences you pick up!

I think the obvious steps, like learning the chord changes and which notes to play etc., comes relatively easily and is the most visible improvement - the smoothness, what turns a choppy sequence of chords into a smooth progression is what time will lend to your playing, but is less evident to yourself as you become used to the improvement. As I said above, I suggest recording your efforts then comparing and contrasting!

All the best. :-)

Rob

If something's not worth doing it's worth forgetting about.
Epiphone Les Paul Std - Yamaha Pacifica 112XJ - Takamine EG340SC - Taylor Baby - Grainger Hammerhead 50 - Grainger Valve Five
http://www.youtube.com/yashicamatonline


   
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(@stellabloo)
Estimable Member
Joined: 17 years ago
Posts: 189
 

Far be it for me to be the main speaker on this subject as I'm only 13 months into my playing, but even now I see improvements I didn't realise. Case in point, a solo I hadn't touched for a few months I played again the other day for the first time. Even though I hadn't practiced it as such, I played it so much more fluently, showing that although I wasn't aware of it, my technique was improving.

Yashi :shock: you've only been playing 13 months? :shock: Think I'll just go crawl under a rock now in shame :oops: .... hang my head and weep :cry: OMG listen to yourself: " a solo I hadn't touched for a few months " :cry:
I must have missed them because I don't remember seeing any of those "Before" videos showing us how much worse you used to be :evil:

What if the Hokey Pokey IS what it's really all about?

~ why yes, I am available on youtube ~
http://www.youtube.com/stellabloo


   
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