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octaves

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(@jeremyd)
Reputable Member
Joined: 18 years ago
Posts: 131
Topic starter  

what exactly is a octave? is it a note a part of a chord?


   
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(@ignar-hillstrom)
Illustrious Member
Joined: 21 years ago
Posts: 5349
 

An octave is interval consisting of two notes, where the second note's frequency is exactly twice that of the first. The octave of A440 is A880, the same note, higher pitch.


   
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(@coloradofenderbender)
Noble Member
Joined: 18 years ago
Posts: 1106
 

An octave is the same note as the root note, played 12 steps higher. There are 12 tones in western music: A, A#, B, C, C#, D, D#, E, F, F#, G, G#. Then, it repeats with A, A#, B, etc.
So, here is an example of an octave: the open note played on the 5th string is A. The note played 12 steps (frets) higher at the 12th fret is also an A, but it is an octave higher.

Your question is a fairly common, basic question. Keep reading the board and you will learn alot in a very short time.


   
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(@guitarteacher)
Trusted Member
Joined: 18 years ago
Posts: 46
 

An octave is the same note as the root note, played 12 steps higher. There are 12 tones in western music: A, A#, B, C, C#, D, D#, E, F, F#, G, G#. Then, it repeats with A, A#, B, etc.
So, here is an example of an octave: the open note played on the 5th string is A. The note played 12 steps (frets) higher at the 12th fret is also an A, but it is an octave higher.

Your question is a fairly common, basic question. Keep reading the board and you will learn alot in a very short time.

No offense mate, but I believe you meant 12 half steps.

Both are offering good information, Jeremy.

If you want to be good, practice. If you want to be great, you must constantly change the way you think.


   
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(@jeremyd)
Reputable Member
Joined: 18 years ago
Posts: 131
Topic starter  

i appreciate it guys!


   
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(@coloradofenderbender)
Noble Member
Joined: 18 years ago
Posts: 1106
 

You are correct, Teacher. My mistake - I meant half steps. Thanks


   
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