Skip to content
Notifications
Clear all

Tuner Calibration

12 Posts
5 Users
0 Reactions
1,524 Views
(@zacharias)
Estimable Member
Joined: 18 years ago
Posts: 113
Topic starter  

I have a Korg CA-30, and I screwed up the calibration by fiddling with it, I figured 440hz would be where it was at before, but my guitar sounded kinda subdued tonewise, I switched it to 445hz and my guitar is beautiful sounding and no longer undiagnosably flat.
What is the difference? Is tuning to 445hz wrong?
Oh kinda off topic but I just got the guitar a few days ago, it's a Seagull S6+ Cedar :D

Zacharias Wolf


   
Quote
(@greybeard)
Illustrious Member
Joined: 21 years ago
Posts: 5840
 

I don't quite know what you could have done to screw up the calibration, but try taking the battery out and leave it out for 10 minutes or so. When you put it back in, you should have a "new" tuner, again.

I started with nothing - and I've still got most of it left.
Did you know that the word "gullible" is not in any dictionary?
Greybeard's Pages
My Articles & Reviews on GN


   
ReplyQuote
(@zacharias)
Estimable Member
Joined: 18 years ago
Posts: 113
Topic starter  

to be honest... I sat on it :oops: lol
thanks for the reply, took your advice and it turns out 440hz is the original calibration. :)
but my guitar seems to sound a bit listless on 440hz in comparison to 445, any reason for that?

Zacharias Wolf


   
ReplyQuote
(@dogbite)
Illustrious Member
Joined: 19 years ago
Posts: 6348
 

at 445 your strings are a bit tauter. they ring out more IMO.
perhaps that pitch is in tune toyour ear...since it sounds better to you.
unfortunately, you wont be able to play with anyone elese at that pitch.
440 is correct.
in fact some strings sound better when a few cents flat.

http://www.soundclick.com/bands/pagemusic.cfm?bandID=644552
http://www.soundclick.com/couleerockinvaders


   
ReplyQuote
(@zacharias)
Estimable Member
Joined: 18 years ago
Posts: 113
Topic starter  

445hz A, would make the A#(ish) right?
I think there should be a topic on tuning tips, and people's preferences concerning that, relating to tone.... good idea? could be an interesting discussion....
My acoustic just has this beautiful singing ring when strummed, and it seems more prominent when sharper, maybe my ears are just trained horribly, as long as the guitar is in tune with itself i have no problems with it, but as you said, it won't sound so pretty with a properly tuned guitar.

Zacharias Wolf


   
ReplyQuote
(@corbind)
Noble Member
Joined: 22 years ago
Posts: 1735
 

440 = A, 466 = Bb, 494 = B. So 445 is not one fret up. More like a half fret I would guess.

"Nothing...can take the place of persistence. Talent will not; nothing is more common than unsuccessful men with talent. Genius will not; unrewarded genius is almost a proverb. Education will not; the world is full of educated derelicts."


   
ReplyQuote
(@misanthrope)
Noble Member
Joined: 18 years ago
Posts: 2261
 

Not even 1/6th of a fret, you probably take it more 'out of tune' when you don't fret cleanly :)

I'm just wondering if when it's sounding fuller you're playing along with something or just the guitar itself? I learned a couple of weeks ago (on this forum, of course), that people sometimes tune one of each pair of strings on a twelve string slightly out to the other, resulting in a fuller sound... just wondering out aloud really :)

ChordsAndScales.co.uk - Guitar Chord/Scale Finder/Viewer


   
ReplyQuote
(@zacharias)
Estimable Member
Joined: 18 years ago
Posts: 113
Topic starter  

The difference to me a barely audable, but I'll change back to 440HZ. My B string always seems kinda flat to me.... maybe I should invest in a buzz feiten tuning system, I would have bought a garrison guitar, but the seagull was just too beautiful....

Zacharias Wolf


   
ReplyQuote
(@greybeard)
Illustrious Member
Joined: 21 years ago
Posts: 5840
 

You may need the intonation looking at. Tune your open B string exactly to B. Now fret it at the 12th fret and see what result you get. If you don't also get an exact B, you need the intonation correcting (this may also be true for the other strings).
A Buzz Feiten System isn't worth adding to a guitar and is non-reversible (part of the fretboard is removed). It also ties you in to one gauge of string, so you can't experiment with lighter/heavier strings.
A far cheaper and reversible improvement could be the Earvana nut and saddle( http://www.earvana.com/ ).

I started with nothing - and I've still got most of it left.
Did you know that the word "gullible" is not in any dictionary?
Greybeard's Pages
My Articles & Reviews on GN


   
ReplyQuote
(@zacharias)
Estimable Member
Joined: 18 years ago
Posts: 113
Topic starter  

Oh yeah I had forgotten about Earvana :?
Does Buzz Feiten really require cutting out a piece of the fretboard!? :shock:
I think I'm going to look into Earvana then.... *shudders*

Zacharias Wolf


   
ReplyQuote
(@greybeard)
Illustrious Member
Joined: 21 years ago
Posts: 5840
 

Yes, it does. The nut is actually sited a little further forward than a normal one to all for the individual compensation of the strings. Earvana does the same thing, but with an overlay.
The other thing with Buzz Feiten is, that the calculations for the compensation include parameters for the string gauge, so if you specify 10s and change to 11s, you negate the BF system.

I started with nothing - and I've still got most of it left.
Did you know that the word "gullible" is not in any dictionary?
Greybeard's Pages
My Articles & Reviews on GN


   
ReplyQuote
(@zacharias)
Estimable Member
Joined: 18 years ago
Posts: 113
Topic starter  

beautiful!! I'm going to invest in that, and some brass bridge pins. :D

Zacharias Wolf


   
ReplyQuote