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Which scales should I practice first?


(@fiddleheadstewy)
New Member
Joined: 11 years ago
Posts: 3
Topic starter  

So which scales should I practice first, there seems to be so many where should I begin? Should I just go to the lessons site here? Myself I like blues guitar, I've seen blues scales on youtube but are there actually blues scales? I really want to get going with this so I can start getting the sounds I want; my playing has become quite stagnant and dull, so where to begin. Thanks


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(@alangreen)
Member Moderator
Joined: 20 years ago
Posts: 5366
 

Start with the major scale - it's the building block from which all things start.

Then move on to the minor pentatonic - the basic soloing scale - the clash between the major third in a chord and the minor third in the pentatonic is what gives blues that characteristic sound. Learn all five patterns.

You'll need to make sure you don't just learn the patterns in isolation - make sure you know there the tonic (root) note is and what it is.

Then move onto the minor scales - there are three; harmonic minor, melodic minor and what's called the "folk" or "natural" minor.

Understand how the minor pentatonic is also the major pentatonic in a different key.

You should aim (eventually) to be able to play a two-octave scale in every key, and three-octave scales from E to A. If you have a 22-fret neck, you can do three-octave scales from E to D, and if you have a 24-fret neck you'll be able to do three-octave scales in any key along with four-octave scales in E

And with 12 keys to work through, that should keep you busy for a couple of years.

Then do some work on whole-tone, whole/half and half/whole-tone scales and at least understand what's going on. And finally, if you're really bored, start working on the old Church Modes which are still in use for jazz-based and some metal music.

It's not like piano, where scales are the starting point and a lot of early lessons involve scale-based music; don't forget to play your guitar between scale sessions.

"Be good at what you can do" - Fingerbanger"
I have always felt that it is better to do what is beautiful than what is 'right'" - Eliot Fisk
Wedding music and guitar lessons in Essex. Listen at: http://www.rollmopmusic.co.uk


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(@ballybiker)
Reputable Member
Joined: 16 years ago
Posts: 494
 

I bet he wishes he hadn't asked

what did the drummer get on his I.Q. test?....

Drool

http://www.myspace.com/ballybiker


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(@fiddleheadstewy)
New Member
Joined: 11 years ago
Posts: 3
Topic starter  

Can I find scale those scale lessons here? Do they have good and simple to understand video tutorials?


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(@alangreen)
Member Moderator
Joined: 20 years ago
Posts: 5366
 

https://www.guitarnoise.com/topic/scales-and-modes/

There's no video. You should be able to understand the lessons well enough without it.

"Be good at what you can do" - Fingerbanger"
I have always felt that it is better to do what is beautiful than what is 'right'" - Eliot Fisk
Wedding music and guitar lessons in Essex. Listen at: http://www.rollmopmusic.co.uk


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(@peaveyusa)
Trusted Member
Joined: 11 years ago
Posts: 75
 

I'd start with the minor tonic scales then move to major tonic. With just those easy scales you can make alot of music. After you have learned them, just browse thru youtube for some backing traks. Most will tell you what key to play in, eventually you can figure it out if theres no key just by hearing it, after you've played the tonics a milion times. But also, take some time off solo and learn your chords

I'm not a pro, I've only been playing a little over a year and this is how I started, it might work for you. I found that when I learned the pentatonics, I was pretty impressed with myself when I started improvising with backing tracks. Improvising opened up a whole new world for me.


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(@matthiasyoung)
Eminent Member
Joined: 11 years ago
Posts: 34
 

One question to ask is are you wanting to become proficient in the guitar in general, or just for a specific style, such as blues that you mentioned? Scales can be practiced either as a musical device or technical device. If you're looking to increase speed, start with chromatic patterns. If you're playing mostly blues, work on your pentatonic and blues scales. Your basic major and minor scales should also be practiced as they can integrate with the pentatonic patterns.


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