Skip to content
What's the Differen...
 
Notifications
Clear all

What's the Difference, pt. II - Chorus vs. Flanger


(@gabba-gabba-hey)
Reputable Member
Joined: 13 years ago
Posts: 355
Topic starter  

Pt. 1 was my vibrato/tremolo post; now I want to know about chorus and flanger.

Is the flanger effect just an extreme chorus effect, or are there other differences in how they operate?

I know the airplane takeoff type of flanger sound, a la EVH or Paul Gilbert, but flanger can get fairly subtle, too. Case in point is Andy Summers of The Police; I thought for sure his sound was based on heavy use of chorus, but I've found out that it was almost always a flanger (EHX Electric Mistress, specifically.)

So, are they the same, just taken to different levels? Can you point out good examples to listen to for the chorus effect?


Quote
(@dogbite)
Illustrious Member
Joined: 17 years ago
Posts: 6353
 

for my ears the Flanger always has that little bit of ascending/descending in it. Chorus wobbles. Flanger doesn't.
that's my 2 cent xplanation.

http://www.soundclick.com/bands/pagemusic.cfm?bandID=644552
http://www.soundclick.com/couleerockinvaders


ReplyQuote
(@hyperborea)
Prominent Member
Joined: 16 years ago
Posts: 833
 

A flanger pedal is replicating the old studio effect of grabbing the flange of the a reel to reel tape and slowing down the playback of the audio. The Beatles used that effect in a number of their later songs (e.g. Blue Jay Way). That's what a flanger pedal is trying to imitate.

Pop music is about stealing pocket money from children. - Ian Anderson


ReplyQuote
(@gnease)
Illustrious Member
Joined: 18 years ago
Posts: 5058
 

from a signal processing point of view, a flanger indeed very similar to a chorus with these differences:
1) has a much shorter time delay (between the dry (unprocessed) and wet (processed) signals that get combined to "flange") and
2) a flanger feeds a bit of it's processed (wet) output back to the input.

often flanging in more subtle than chorus, imparting just that metallic edge to the notes. it gets extreme and whoosing when the LFO that drives the delay value is set to a high rate and the wet-dry ratio is aggressive, e.g., 1:1.

-=tension & release=-


ReplyQuote
 Nuno
(@nuno)
Famed Member
Joined: 16 years ago
Posts: 3998
 

This page also explains the differences between these effects (and many more): http://users.sa.chariot.net.au/~gmarts/fx-desc.htm

Hope it helps.


ReplyQuote
(@gabba-gabba-hey)
Reputable Member
Joined: 13 years ago
Posts: 355
Topic starter  

Thanks for the info everyone!


ReplyQuote
(@kent_eh)
Noble Member
Joined: 16 years ago
Posts: 1885
 

Or for a slightly less technical description of different effects:
http://musicgearcompany.wordpress.com/2009/01/23/guitar-effects-pedals-monkey-explains-it-all/

I wrapped a newspaper ’round my head
So I looked like I was deep


ReplyQuote
(@faultythinking)
Eminent Member
Joined: 13 years ago
Posts: 23
 

This page also explains the differences between these effects (and many more): http://users.sa.chariot.net.au/~gmarts/fx-desc.htm

Or for a slightly less technical description of different effects:
http://musicgearcompany.wordpress.com/2009/01/23/guitar-effects-pedals-monkey-explains-it-all/

What a brilliant pair of links; bookmarked for sure!

FT
I think I can rock and roll
Probably just twisting...


ReplyQuote