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Scales within Scales

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 jjg
(@jjg)
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Joined: 15 years ago
Posts: 2
Topic starter  

The 4th paragraph down from the "V of ..." chart says that in a I, V of II, IV, I progression in a G major scale that would equate to G, A, C, G.

after reading the article, my understanding was that it would be G, E, C, G.

which is correct?


   
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(@noteboat)
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Joined: 21 years ago
Posts: 4921
 

In G major, the II is A. If you're in the key of A, the V is E. So a I-V/II-IV-I progression in G would be G, E, C, G.

A G-A-C-G progression would be I-V/V-IV-I.

But both are a stretch in terms of analysis. The "V/x" notation indicates a secondary dominant chord. Dominant chords are built on the dominant tone of the scale - the fifth degree. If you're temporarily leaving the key, and maintaining a sense of overall tonality by using a secondary dominant, that V/II needs to be followed by a II chord - if it isn't, it's not a "V". There can be other analysis of the progression, but it wouldn't be a secondary dominant.

The progression G-E-C-G would usually be analyzed as I-VI-IV-I. (The progression in key would be I-vi-IV-I; you usually use lower case to indicate minor chord types). You'd only call it V/II if the progression was G-E-Am-C-G.

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 jjg
(@jjg)
New Member
Joined: 15 years ago
Posts: 2
Topic starter  

thank you note, my scope of knowledge on the matter is too intermediate to really understand however.

someone should probably edit the lesson with the change.


   
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