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writing songs...What are they made of?

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(@bstguitarist)
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Joined: 20 years ago
Posts: 353
Topic starter  

I want to write songs, but I dont know what specifically defines an intro, bridge, chorus, verse, etc. can someone please tell me in detail what these are so that I can understand what they are and how they are made? :!:


No matter what anyone says, these four men were the Innovators! of modern Rock & Roll!

Morse Code... Music on it's own


   
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(@anonymous)
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Joined: 17 years ago
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An intro is a short instrumental section (usually 4 or 8 bars) that begins the song. This is before the vocal comes in.

A verse is usually the first section the singer sings. It's often 8 or 16 bars long. A song usually has two or more verses. The music is usually the same in verses, but the lyrics change from verse to verse.

A chorus is usually the next section after the verse.It should have a different chord progression than the verse.The chorus is usually the part of the song where the music and lyrics build to a climax,or central point. The "hook" of the song, which is usually the title of the song, is contained in the chorus.The highest note of the melody is usually in the chorus. Usually a chorus will repeat with exactly the same chords and lyrics.

A bridge usually happens only once in a song,and has different chords and lyrics than the verse and chorus.Sometimes the bridge is called "the middle eight" (meaning 8 bars) That's what the Beatles called it.

A lot of songs don't have bridges. In some songs the"hook" or title is included at the end of the verse and doesn't have a separate chorus.

In "Jingle Bells" the chorus is "Jingle Bells Jingle Bells Jingle All the Way, etc....

The verse is the"Dashing through the snow.." part. It doesn't have a bridge.

http://www.guitarforsongwriters.com


   
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(@bstguitarist)
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Joined: 20 years ago
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Topic starter  

thanks for your help! :D


No matter what anyone says, these four men were the Innovators! of modern Rock & Roll!

Morse Code... Music on it's own


   
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(@garytalley)
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Joined: 20 years ago
Posts: 54
 

You're welcome. That was me. I just forgot to sign in.

http://www.guitarforsongwriters.com

creator of #1 video"Guitar Playing for Songwriters"


   
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(@ajcharron)
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Joined: 16 years ago
Posts: 121
 

Hi!

A long ways back I (about 4 years ago) I wrote a detailed article on the subject. You'll find it here: https://www.guitarnoise.com/article.php?id=126

It's no-nonsense and sticks to the facts although some people disagree with it. Even if you prefer to call a cat a four-legged nuisance or a fur ball, it's still a cat. Even if it's missing a leg or tail or whatever.

This article should clear things up for you.


   
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(@omega)
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Joined: 20 years ago
Posts: 92
 

I think its important to remember that a song isn't necessarily made of an intro-verse-chorus structure. Its simply a collection of musical and/or lyrical ideas, so perhaps the song would sound best if it didn't have a chorus, etc. Perhaps I'm a little off topic, but a song doesn't always need an intro or (name a section.)

Somnium Dulcis.


   
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(@bleaseyhighflyer)
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Posts: 41
 

Of course songs dont have to follow a solid structure or pattern, as you can use different timings, rythms, and chord progressions to create whatever you want

I think its always important to playback your songs as much as possible so that YOU know that it flows.

I usually wreite lyrics to my songs, make sense of them and then fit them in, taking chunks of lyrics and wrapping them around the chords to create verses, chorus's, bridges, interludes............whatever

" Ah man, that went down like a lead balloon."


   
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(@omega)
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Joined: 20 years ago
Posts: 92
 

Personally, I always complete the lyrics (and the vocal melody) first...that just seems more natural, as it gives a better idea for a riff/guitar melody, which is extremely useful when trying to solo or write a musical interlude.

Somnium Dulcis.


   
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