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CAGED for Dummies

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(@call_me_kido)
Estimable Member
Joined: 20 years ago
Posts: 179
Topic starter  

It seems that sometimes the more we try to teach, the less others feel they know, forgive me genious' of the guitar world.

So lets talk about CAGED....or Call A Girl Every Day. Just kidding, I made that up. But seriously...what is it....CAGED, CAGED. Well it is at least all of the following.

1. The open possition chord voicings of the most "guitar friendly" keys. C, A, G, E and D. For our instrument.

2. A system of mastering (or at least memerizing) Scales, Modes, and the fretboard, in all aspects of the word.

3. A very confusing and sometimes frustrating array of fingerings, degrees and patterns.

So that being said, what do I do when something doesnt make sense? Charts....we need charts.....good ones....

Here is Caged Kido style....

Now great...Ive given everything and more that CAGED actually is. Its all there...All seven modes, accomodating arpeggios, and a little fretboard logic to boot. Big deal.

Im not one to argue the chicken and the EGG, but unfortunately we have little choice in situations like these. So it would appear that the forms presented above do in fact come from the open possition chords we all learn in the very beginning, or C-A-G-E-D. But since chords are actually constructed of selective scale tones....it would be more accurate to say that the chords came from CAGED then vice versa.

This is where people get caught....whats easier to teach?....almost every possible combination of fingerings (western music) withing a five fret connectable network of confusing patters....or an open C chord. I beleive my point has been taken.

So long story short. CAGED format isnt easy...noone said it was. The guitar isnt actually that easy, noone said it was. So this is what your gonna do.

Monday- C

Tuseday- A

Wedsday- G

Thursday- E

Friday- D

Sat/sun Whatever you want.

Play the modes, play the arpeggios, over and over and over. Listen to them...remember them, and most of all HEAR them.

This isnt rocket science...its much more difficult. :lol:

So this is what Im gonna do...Im gonna sit at this hotel desk, stroke my tie.....answer my phone, check in my guests and wait for your questions. And then, Im going to answer them.

Ill be waiting...

Kido


   
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(@gizzy)
Estimable Member
Joined: 20 years ago
Posts: 109
 

:) This is some real good info, I have been using mostly the major and minor Pentatonic scales, so the Modes and Arpeggios are something for me to learn I have watched some other guitar players on dvd's and the arpeggios and modes seem to fit, good info, time to Practice. :D


   
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(@corbind)
Noble Member
Joined: 21 years ago
Posts: 1735
 

Nice Post, Kido. Thanks for taking the time to put that stuff out there for us! :)

"Nothing...can take the place of persistence. Talent will not; nothing is more common than unsuccessful men with talent. Genius will not; unrewarded genius is almost a proverb. Education will not; the world is full of educated derelicts."


   
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(@scratchmonkey)
Honorable Member
Joined: 20 years ago
Posts: 603
 

Kido,

Thanks for these. My practice routine has been horrible for quite some months, and this might offer some direction. I have a question about the charts though. (I probably should start with CAGED for flat-out retards)

A lot of the charts have more dots than I have fingers on my fretting hand. How are they supposed to be read? I realize this question should go on the beginner's forum, but this is where you posted the charts, so here it is. I've seen charts like this in any number of forums / books, and whenever the dots > fingers, I turn to another source. But I better learn these, so how do I read the charts?

(sorry for being so inept, but this is about the best place I know of to ask such fundamental questions)

Thanks,
-- Scratch 8)

-- Scratch 8)


"...if heartaches were commercials, we'd all be on TV" -- John Prine
42


   
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(@slothrob)
Reputable Member
Joined: 20 years ago
Posts: 472
 

Okay, I will begin to practice this and see if it finally sinks through whatever blockade my brain has obviously set up to prevent contamination by actual information.

Oh, and thanks for all the work, having all this in one place should help a lot.


   
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(@uraliss)
Active Member
Joined: 20 years ago
Posts: 7
 

Thanks for posting these Kido.
I don't totally understand what the caged system is yet.
Can somebody give me a real simple explanation of what the CAGED system will do for me?

If I start practicing these patterns what advantages will that give me?


   
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(@musenfreund)
Illustrious Member
Joined: 21 years ago
Posts: 5108
 

If you want a good sense of how this system helps you understand the fretboard and chord voicings, I recommend Bill Edwards's very inexpensive book, Fretboard Logic. There's an interview with Bill Edwards on this site: Interview with Bill Edwards that Paul conducted. I recommend any of you wondering about the CAGED system take a look at the interview. Edwards talks about the system there. His book on the system is, I believe, considered groundbreaking and sells for about $10. I recommend it highly.

Well we all shine on--like the moon and the stars and the sun.
-- John Lennon


   
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(@call_me_kido)
Estimable Member
Joined: 20 years ago
Posts: 179
Topic starter  

Kido,

Thanks for these. My practice routine has been horrible for quite some months, and this might offer some direction. I have a question about the charts though. (I probably should start with CAGED for flat-out retards)

A lot of the charts have more dots than I have fingers on my fretting hand. How are they supposed to be read? I realize this question should go on the beginner's forum, but this is where you posted the charts, so here it is. I've seen charts like this in any number of forums / books, and whenever the dots > fingers, I turn to another source. But I better learn these, so how do I read the charts?

(sorry for being so inept, but this is about the best place I know of to ask such fundamental questions)

Thanks,
-- Scratch 8)
Hey no problem,

It seems alot of people are very appreciative for this, and in turn so am I.

So to answer your question the reason there seem to be more fingerings then fingers on your fretting hand is because there are more.

Ill use the "C" chart as an example. I am going to alter the chart to show you where you need to place your exact finger for each note. Then copy the format to the other charts...Ive reviewed and edited the charts throughly I dont beleive there to be any errors.

The fingerings will vary from source to source, I personally prefer the ones above...and have seem them cited by the most sources as Ive written them.

Hope this helps.

Im serious...get your metronome...sit down and practice the charts.

Kido


   
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(@slydog)
Reputable Member
Joined: 20 years ago
Posts: 243
 

Thanks for that last post, Kido. It makes a lot more sense to me now. I think there was too much info above for me to sort it out.

Blame it on the lies that killed us, blame it on the truth that ran us down.


   
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(@scratchmonkey)
Honorable Member
Joined: 20 years ago
Posts: 603
 

Hope this helps.

It helps immensely, Kido. Now I can't wait to get home and practice these. Thanks a million.

-- Scratch 8)

-- Scratch 8)


"...if heartaches were commercials, we'd all be on TV" -- John Prine
42


   
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(@marshall)
Trusted Member
Joined: 20 years ago
Posts: 52
 

WOW, these are great. I printed them out and I am going to start applying them to my practice schedule. let me ask you this though....what would you suggest in time wise, spending on these per day, i.e. 30 minutes? an Hour? all day nonstop? lol But seriously, what would be a good amount of time to spend on these charts per day? thanks

Also I assum that your charts are dealing in the first five frets. (yes i know that these shapes can be moved all around) but is that correct, start at the first 5 frets?

All you know about me is what I've sold you. I sold out long before you ever heard my name.
I sold my soul to make a record, Dip sh#t, And you bought one. ~Maynard James Keenan~


   
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(@call_me_kido)
Estimable Member
Joined: 20 years ago
Posts: 179
Topic starter  

Hey guys,

Well this is really a geat response Im getting, it feels great to know you guys can use this stuff as much as I am. Ive come to the conclusion that almost every player, including me, needs some motivation. So this is my plan......

Im going to organize a group of members, who (if willing) would like to commit themselves to a practice regimen Im putting together for myself starting in a few days. It will run MON-FRI everyday without fail, saturdays and sundays left for their own device.

I have updated all of my charts, and am creating a song construction table with common generic formats and common chord progressions to aid in a brainstorming experiment I think that will make us all develop much faster. The practice regimen will run from 1-2 hours....I havent decided yet, and all participants will be dedicated to following it exactly, with no excuses for missing a session. If a session is skipped, it will be compensated for in double time.

I beleive that if we all dedicate ourselves to this group, it will give us a reason to "find the time" to practice when we all know we can and SHOULD. And I am as guilty as anyone for this, ignoring it anyway.

The most difficult thing about practicing is not knowing what to do for how long, so.....

I will post what scales, arpeggios, and chords to practice for how long on each of the five days. There will be charts, permutations, and modulations with diagrams for everything (I have almost completed them anyway). Each day will have a different possition applied from CAGED format, because I beleive it is the easiest way for players of all styles and ability to become better irregardless of experience.

There will be no repetition of excersises on any day.

We will create a song based on a predetermined format, consisting of a prior arrangement created at random by me, EVERY day. This will include BPM, Bridge-Chorus-Verse construction, Key and Harmony. All specifics will be created by the individual following the guidelines. I also think that submitting any recorded results from this would be an awsome way to share our ideas and improvement, this will be up to you.

We will practice:

-Scales, including modes and pentatonics.

-Arpeggios

-Chords

-Song construction

-Triads

Every single day. I am also open to the idea of every week, beginning Monday, choosing a new song for the entire group to work on. This will be a guitar only peice, which can be practiced and studied by participants of any experience level. I will accept song nominations any time and present it to the group. We will dedicate a portion of each practice session to working on this peice.

If you think youd be interested post yourself in here. The more names we get the more likely it is this will work.

I dont care if you have to practice at 3 in the morning to make it work. I want 1-2 hours 5 days a week from all of you (Perferrably two).

So lets hear it... Ill be waiting.

Kido


   
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(@marshall)
Trusted Member
Joined: 20 years ago
Posts: 52
 

I'm there...I play rock and metal but i also play alot of acoustic stuff too. so my musical taste are very wide and i want to concentrate more on acoustic stuff as well as electric. so count me in.

All you know about me is what I've sold you. I sold out long before you ever heard my name.
I sold my soul to make a record, Dip sh#t, And you bought one. ~Maynard James Keenan~


   
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(@scellis)
New Member
Joined: 19 years ago
Posts: 1
 

The thing that made this click for me was to play the C major scale down the neck.

Start with 6th string open (E) play familiar scale - the 'C' shape
Move down and start, 6th string, second finger, 3rd fret (G) - the 'A' shape
Move down to first finger on 5th fret (A) - the 'G' shape
Move down to second finger on 8th fret (C) - the (most common) 'E' shape
Move down to first finger on 8th fret (C) - 'D' shape

this is like playing all the white keys on a piano and for me, easier to call out each note as I play them ("C, D, E, etc..")

Once you get this then you can start thinking about modes, major Pentatonic, and arpeggio's

Next move up to key of D, etc....

Simon..........


   
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(@metaellihead)
Honorable Member
Joined: 20 years ago
Posts: 653
 

Just so I'm clear, the roman neumerals above the charts represent what fret the top of the chart is at?

-Metaellihead


   
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