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Owning a club

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(@danlasley)
Noble Member
Joined: 16 years ago
Posts: 2118
 

As noted by the offers on those websites, $200-500K will get you started, and don't forget that unless you're building from scratch, there will be some existing cash-flow. Plus you can get a loan to finance the purchase.

That's not to say that you don't need a good chunk of reserve cash, but you shouldn't have to run everything out of your pocket for 6 months.

Laz


   
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(@twistedfingers)
Honorable Member
Joined: 21 years ago
Posts: 596
 

Taso,

And anytime you serve alcohol there will be problems sooner or later so you will need at least 1 - 2 security personnel.

IF you need a chief head cracker, I happen to know a guy that's spent some time bouncing clubs, and working various forms of security for the last 6 years or so.... Know him very well, I shave his face in the mornings. :wink: :D

Life is not a journey to the grave with the intention of arriving safely in a pretty and well preserved body, but rather to skid in broadside, thoroughly used up, totally worn out, and loudly proclaiming -- "WOW--What a Ride!"


   
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 Taso
(@taso)
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Joined: 21 years ago
Posts: 2811
Topic starter  

So that's why your fingers are twisted eh?

I'll keep you in mind ;)

The starting money isn't that big of an issue. 500-1m is probably going to be doable. If prices stay where they are, and its 200k-500, that'll be even better.

I'm planning way in ahead. Still got 5 more years ;)

I guess I just wanted to see if I should think of something else to do, ya know.

http://taso.dmusic.com/music/


   
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 geoo
(@geoo)
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Joined: 19 years ago
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So that's why your fingers are twisted eh?

I'll keep you in mind ;)

The starting money isn't that big of an issue. 500-1m is probably going to be doable. If prices stay where they are, and its 200k-500, that'll be even better.

I'm planning way in ahead. Still got 5 more years ;)

I guess I just wanted to see if I should think of something else to do, ya know.

I think you should check how cost effective it would be to open it in a different state, say Oklahoma, for example. Five years probably isnt really even that early. But its a great start. When I was thinking of doing the same thing, on a lot smaller scale, I bought this book called "Upstart Guide Owning & Managing Bar or Tavern " and it helped a ton.

Geoo

“The hardest thing in life is to know which bridge to cross and which to burn” - David Russell (Scottish classical Guitarist. b.1942)


   
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 Taso
(@taso)
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Was that book name a joke? haha, that sounds perfect.

http://taso.dmusic.com/music/


   
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(@blackzerogsh)
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Joined: 20 years ago
Posts: 759
 

If you open up in NY, and Im still here in 5 years, talk to me, I might need a job :lol:


   
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 geoo
(@geoo)
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Joined: 19 years ago
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Was that book name a joke? haha, that sounds perfect.

Nope, not a joke. And its a great book. Little shallow in some areas but great reading material. Heck, I would have givin you mind had my ex not stollen it out of spite.

Geoo

“The hardest thing in life is to know which bridge to cross and which to burn” - David Russell (Scottish classical Guitarist. b.1942)


   
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(@chris-c)
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Joined: 19 years ago
Posts: 3454
 

Sorry, 25 hours was a mistake - it's nearer 26. :lol: :lol: :lol:

Greybeard is right on the money there. (In fact he might still be underestimating a little so that you don't get put off... 8) )

I've owned and run several businesses from scratch and the only way to make any headway is to work insanely hard at it, particularly at the beginning. If you don't, whatever money you make just goes to pay other people. Until you get some momentum going it will dominate all aspects of your life.

In the days when I travelled I also worked in bars/restaurants for a while, including an enormous Greek owned place in Boston (Usually I had vital roles such as managing the cleaning of the dishes :roll: ). The hours are incredibly long and it all looks a lot less glossy from the inside looking out.

If you haven't already done so, it would be great to work in the industry for a while to really get a feel for it. There are a heck of a lot of angles to cover (which is one of the reason why it's interesting - lots of different things to deal with). But there are down sides too. The hours you keep can make meshing in with friends with regular jobs hard to do. You have to deal with a lot of jerks. The constant presence of alcohol can cause big problems for many people in the industry (they either become addicted themselves and/or have to deal with a lot of stupid boozy behaviour from patrons) and so on.

You are also at the mercy of competition and "fashion". Whether it's the venue itself, the food, the acts, or the mix of other customers all the angles can go up and down apparently on a whim. That can be exciting, or a pain in the bum, depending on what you like in life.

There's a lot of good stuff too though. Often there's a real camaraderie that builds up in those sort of jobs, and each night is a new test of whether the "troops" can keep it all humming along as it should. 8)


Good luck with finding a job in the industry. Hope you enjoy what you find, and can then put some shape to your ultimate dream of being 'da man at da top..'. :D

Cheers, Chris


   
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(@kingpatzer)
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Joined: 19 years ago
Posts: 2171
 

I understand not wanting to get screwed -- but you will have to have either a partner or a hired manager from the start.

Why?

Because there will be stuff going on 24 hours a day, and you can't be there all the time. So you have to have someone who holds the keys to the safe, and in whom you can invest management authority for when you aren't there.

It really is a tough way to make a living, especially starting out.

"The music business is a cruel and shallow money trench, a long plastic hallway where thieves and pimps run free, and good men die like dogs. There's also a negative side." -- HST


   
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 Taso
(@taso)
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Joined: 21 years ago
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Topic starter  

Gotta be honest, some of this stuff is pretty...discouraging.

I still think this is what I want to do. I can't imagine doing something that I'm not interested in, working a 9-5 job that I don't like, just to pay the bills. That's not living, to me.

I like this idea because I'd have a chance to be around music, (maybe even play sometimes ;) ) , I'd be meeting musicians constantly, and I'd (hopefully) end up making some money.

No, I have no experience in the industry. I plan on getting a job at a blues bar/club when I get out of high school. Going to school in Philly probably, so considering that it's a city, shouldn't be too hard to find an establishment that is hiring.

Thanks again
Taso

http://taso.dmusic.com/music/


   
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(@johnin510)
Trusted Member
Joined: 18 years ago
Posts: 69
 

I know this might be late on a reply.....I have owned (notice past tense) a club in VA. It was an underground metal place. I have to say it is cool. Just make sure you are ready for 16 hour days, know ALL the laws that go with the club (fire, alcohol, building codes, advertising,etc....) I do not know how the NY laws, but in VA they were strict...so strict it was hard to make money (It does not help when the state controls all alcohol). The cool things about it are you meet ALOT of people that that common interest as you......MUSIC!! Having bands every other night is cool too. I just wanted to give you a heads up on all the things involved. I could go on for days. If you do have any questions, please let me know. Golden rule: There is NO such thing as an honest bartender!!!

John in the 510


   
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 Taso
(@taso)
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Topic starter  

Well just a little update here:

I'm still pretty sure that this is what I want to do with my life. I am enrolled for the Fall semester of 2006 at Drexel University in Philadelphia, taking Business Administration at LeBow's. I hope to find a band/group of blues musicians in Philly to play with, and I hope to get a job at a jazz/blues club (not playing, but doing whatever I can do there, waiting, bussing, etc)

http://taso.dmusic.com/music/


   
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(@davidhodge)
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Joined: 17 years ago
Posts: 4472
 

That's a good game plan! Best of luck with it. You should be able to find a lot going on in Philadelphia.

Don't know how you're set for transportation (or even of the distances involved) but Dave Bromberg's place in Wilmington, Delaware has blues jams once a week. Don't remember if it's on Tuesdat or Thursday. One of the two. You might meet some folks there that will either be connections or get you some.

Peace


   
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(@dsparling)
Reputable Member
Joined: 19 years ago
Posts: 289
 

There was a great article on Bromberg in the Washington Post in April:

http://www.washingtonpost.com/wp-dyn/content/article/2006/04/05/AR2006040502604.html

According to the article:

"bluegrass on Tuesdays, blues on Thursdays"

http://www.dougsparling.com/
http://www.300monks.com/store/products.php?cat=59
http://www.myspace.com/dougsparling
https://www.guitarnoise.com/author/dougsparling/


   
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 Taso
(@taso)
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Joined: 21 years ago
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Topic starter  

Awesome, thanks guys.

Def gonna hafta check that place out.

http://taso.dmusic.com/music/


   
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