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G string ring at headstock

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 ss43
(@ss43)
Trusted Member
Joined: 18 years ago
Posts: 63
Topic starter  

Picked up a new US strat a few months ago. The G string rings at the headstock and comes through the amp when playing, very annoying. It took me awhile to figure it out. I have never had this happen on my other guitars. It only has a string tree on B/E - so I wonder. I can mute the strings with my left hand, strum it once, pull my hand away and get obnoxious sustain for days ring until I mute it. What can I do about this other than shoving some ugly piece of foam up there?


   
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(@ricochet)
Illustrious Member
Joined: 21 years ago
Posts: 7833
 

With all of my acoustics, if I strum the strings hard and abruptly mute them, there's a metallic "clank" sound after the strings stop ringing that's coming from the string lengths between the nut and tuners ringing. I'll bet a narrow strip of foam right above the nut would inconspicuously mute them, but I've never felt the need. I just think it's part of the sound. If that string is conspicuously doing it more than others, perhaps that slot of the nut is loose?

"A cheerful heart is good medicine."


   
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(@racetruck1)
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Joined: 19 years ago
Posts: 518
 

There should be a string tree on the head stock that the G string would fit under, make sure that it is touching the string.

Some models don't have them for the G, try sliding something soft under the strings and see if it stops, then check that the string has enough downforce at the nut and that the slot isn't too big.

If the string does not have enough down force, you might consider installing a string tree.

If the slots in the nut are too big, then it's time for a new nut, the biggest problem with a strat type guitar is getting the old nut out. Try tapping it out from the side, sometimes this works, if it doesn't, the carefully cut it in half along it's length and use a pair of pliers to crush it and free it.

Like every time I give advice, if you are not comfortable doing this, take it to a shop and have it professionally done, it shouldn't be very expensive!

When I die, I want to go peacefully in my sleep like my grandfather, not screaming......
like the passengers in his car.


   
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(@wes-inman)
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Joined: 21 years ago
Posts: 5582
 

Sounds like the nut slot is too wide. You could try a heavier gauge string.

I have solved this before by lifting the string out of the nut and placing a thin piece of tissue paper under the string. I let the string relax back down in the nut pinning the paper down and carefully tear away all excess tissue. You can't even see it and it works, doesn't affect the tone either.

Maybe not the very best answer, but it works and won't damage your guitar.

If you know something better than Rock and Roll, I'd like to hear it - Jerry Lee Lewis


   
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 ss43
(@ss43)
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Joined: 18 years ago
Posts: 63
Topic starter  

I placed a piece of foam under the strings between the tuners and the nut. It stopped the problem. I might try and find some asthetically pleasing little rubber ball thingy, slit it, and slide it on the G string between the nut to dampen it.


   
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(@misanthrope)
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Joined: 18 years ago
Posts: 2261
 

You can't even see it and it works, doesn't affect the tone either.
At the very least, that would give you a definate answer to the question...

ChordsAndScales.co.uk - Guitar Chord/Scale Finder/Viewer


   
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(@wes-inman)
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Joined: 21 years ago
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I placed a piece of foam under the strings between the tuners and the nut. It stopped the problem. I might try and find some asthetically pleasing little rubber ball thingy, slit it, and slide it on the G string between the nut to dampen it.

OK, this sounds different. Most Strats have a string tree on the E/B and G/D strings. This pulls the string down at an angle. The nut slots have to line up with this angle. It could be the nut is cut to this angle (slanting down toward the headstock), but the string is approaching at a higher angle. So it is resting at the front of the nut alone. Hope you know what I'm describing. The string may have a tiny gap between it and the nut slot going toward the headstock. The string is vibrating against the nut causing the annoying ring.

You might try installing a tree string for the G/D strings.

When you press down on the G string between the tuners and nut does the ringing stop?

You can also buy a nut slot file (expensive) and make sure the nut slot is cut to the proper angle.

If you know something better than Rock and Roll, I'd like to hear it - Jerry Lee Lewis


   
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(@racetruck1)
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Joined: 19 years ago
Posts: 518
 

Actually, I forgot about Wes's solution, I think every other guitar I have has at least one piece of tissue under the string! Good going, Boss! :D

I'm just too lazy to make nuts for them and they play well anyway!

When I die, I want to go peacefully in my sleep like my grandfather, not screaming......
like the passengers in his car.


   
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(@trguitar)
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Joined: 18 years ago
Posts: 3709
 

I believe my MIM Strat has a single string tree, but I have no problems with buzz or rattle. I always wondered why it didn't have 2. :?

"Work hard, rock hard, eat hard, sleep hard,
grow big, wear glasses if you need 'em."
-- The Webb Wilder Credo --


   
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 ss43
(@ss43)
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Joined: 18 years ago
Posts: 63
Topic starter  

Wes - Thanks. A little tissue on the under the G-string at the nut (boy, that just doesn't sound right) worked.


   
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(@quarterfront)
Reputable Member
Joined: 19 years ago
Posts: 225
 

My 2004 MIM Strat had only one string tree and it always did tend to give me some ringing on the 3rd & 4th strings. I added a second string tree and the problem went away.


   
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