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Tune-O-Matic Bridge Issue, Please Help!

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(@thermon)
New Member
Joined: 13 years ago
Posts: 2
Topic starter  

I guess I might as well go from the start. I own a Dean V (no, not one of the crappy $200 ones) and I was having some issues with it. At one point, I had taken off the Tuno-O-Matic part of the bridge to clean under it and put it back on, and when I put it back on, there was a number of issues. Action was out (that was easily fixed) but the problem is/was that when I play a stacatto (basically play the note and then almost immediately stop it) note, it sounds like there is a loud, tinny, almost harmonic vibration from the strings in between the the Tuno-o-matic and the piece for the body-through. I tried everything, including dampening with felt and trying to use electrical tape. Nothing worked. I talked to a professional and they said that I should get a new bridge. I have a BC Rich Mockingbird that I absolutely treasure (I'm guessing there will be plenty of BC Rich haters, but DAMN, I love this guitar to death, I prefer it even to my Fender Strat) that has a Tune-O-Matic of the same size, so I thought it was worth a shot trying the BC Rich one on the Dean. Didn't help, so I replaced the bridge on my Mockingbird and the same problems arose in the Mockingbird, but there is a lot of buzz at the bridge as well. I don't want to sound over dramatic, but I'm pretty discouraged over it. I can live with the Dean being messed up, but I love that Mockingbird to death, and want to get it back to perfect condition ASAP. It sounds very obnoxious when it is played in it's current condition, and there is no way to just "ignore" it. If anyone could help, you'd be a blessing. I am in rather immediate need of it because of a band situation.

PS: I had an issue with my strat that made it sounded exactly the same as the other guitars, but that was easily fixed by placing a piece of paper between the springs for the tremolo and the inner body. Just thought I'd clarify that so if anyone is familiar with that issue, they might have a better understanding of the sound I tried describing from the Dean and BC Rich. I fixed the strat, but these are totally different bridges so repeating methods is not an option.


   
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(@blue-jay)
Noble Member
Joined: 15 years ago
Posts: 1630
 

Yes, try a new bridge from Stew Mac for instance, like a Nashville with plenty of adjustment, plus they are super solid.

http://www.stewmac.com/shop/Bridges,_tailpieces/Electric_guitar,_Tune-o-matic_bridges.html

I am familiar with that Strat problem. It is rare. The claw that holds the springs needs to be taken off and bent up a bit, unless you are comfortable with just unhooking the springs and bending it up with a screwdriver underneath - I wouldn't want to gouge the wood, and break the paint, even if you can't see it. It happens with an odd shaped claw, or when screwed down "low". To put it simply the springs have to travel through "air" & not contact or rub on the body, making vibration etc.

Like a bird on the wire,
like a drunk in a midnight choir
I have tried in my way to be free.


   
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(@thermon)
New Member
Joined: 13 years ago
Posts: 2
Topic starter  

Thanks, I'll look into the strat further! I gave it a bit of a rigged fix but I'll go back and do what you suggested. Doesn't help with the other 2 guitars but you're advice on the strat is still greatly appreciated and will be used so thank you.


   
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(@blue-jay)
Noble Member
Joined: 15 years ago
Posts: 1630
 

You're welcome. Good luck with that.

Like a bird on the wire,
like a drunk in a midnight choir
I have tried in my way to be free.


   
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(@nethanpaul)
Eminent Member
Joined: 6 years ago
Posts: 44
 

If your guitars, especially your Mockingbird, are buzzing, focus on the Tune-o-Matic bridge. First, get an expert to check for loose parts or incorrect saddle height. They'll pinpoint what's causing the buzz. Then, make adjustments like tightening screws or setting saddle height correctly. If needed, consider replacing the bridge with a quality one like Gotoh or TonePros. But remember, replacing the bridge might not solve the problem if it's elsewhere. So, it's best to have a pro check it first.
By following these steps, you can fix the buzzing issue and get your Mockingbird sounding great again. And don't forget to share your experience with others—it might help them troubleshoot their own guitar problems too!


   
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