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impedence

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(@almann1979)
Noble Member
Joined: 16 years ago
Posts: 1281
Topic starter  

well, im totally lost. i have a valveking v212 and i love the lead channel and the pinch harmonics i can get from it. however
Q1 - the clean channel sounds a bit muddy when i strum chords but not when i play scales or other one note at a time stuff -even with the bright switch on. any ideas on how to sort this out?
q2. there is also an impedenc swith at the back that says 4,8, or 16 ohms. i havent played with it because im not sure weather this is only to be used if i was feeding the amp through other speakers or not, and i dont want to break anything. doe anybody know what it is for, and if it will affect the tone? thanks

"I like to play that guitar. I have to stare at it while I'm playing it because I'm not very good at playing it."
Noel Gallagher (who took the words right out of my mouth)


   
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(@greybeard)
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Joined: 21 years ago
Posts: 5840
 

Normally, the impedance switch is only there for when speakers, other than whatever comes as standard, is replaced. So, if you were to attach an external cab or you replaced the standard speaker(s) with speakers having a different impedance, you would need to set the switch appropriately.

As for the muddiness, it could be the pickups. You don't say what the guitar is (and what pickups are fitted). My first guess would be that they're humbuckers.

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(@almann1979)
Noble Member
Joined: 16 years ago
Posts: 1281
Topic starter  

there wilkinson pickups - so not brilliant ones, but i dont get the muddy sound from my practice amps?

"I like to play that guitar. I have to stare at it while I'm playing it because I'm not very good at playing it."
Noel Gallagher (who took the words right out of my mouth)


   
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(@wes-inman)
Illustrious Member
Joined: 20 years ago
Posts: 5582
 

Too much bass will often muddy your tone. Everyone is different, but standard tone settings for me are:

Lows- 3-5
Mids- 7-10 (or 12 on some amps)
Highs- 6-7

However, on my Blues Jr I boost Lows almost to max, so every amp is a little different.

Lots of folks boost their Lows and Highs and cut their Mids to get the famous "scooped Mids" tone. This is the famous smiley face you see on EQs.

This tone does sound very warm and full when playing alone at home. But if you get out and play with others, especially a bass player, you will find that no matter how loud you turn your amp's volume, you cannot hear yourself. You are getting buried by the bass because you are playing the same tones. A bass will always bury you here. Try cutting your Lows and Highs some and boost your Mids, this is where guitar tone is centered. You will immediately notice that your guitar is easier to hear in a mix. You will think your amp is twice as loud.

At home or playing alone this tone may not sound as good as your tone with boosted Lows and Highs. But if you want to be heard, boost the Mids.

Here is a good video on adjusting the EQ on your amp. Very good advice here.

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=TQanVdQPAMg&feature=related

But I suspect too much Lows (bass) is muddying up your tone.

If you know something better than Rock and Roll, I'd like to hear it - Jerry Lee Lewis


   
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