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tone changes while playing loud

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(@uninvited)
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Joined: 19 years ago
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"Set the amp your amp up just the same way you do at home and have the studio mic it. it is means putting 4 or 5 mic's on it then thats what they'll have to do. "...
does it mean: i ll go with the level i worked at home and they will mic it.but not with one mic but with 4 or 5 mics :shock:? but i think it's enough with one while practicing with band but not recording right? ...and can you describe how can i use cd or headphone out effectively?..and finally what is a dummy load :roll: ...thx to all


   
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(@mcdouggy)
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Okay here goes:

They may close mic it (up against the speaker grille) with one or two mics, then use the rest for ambient recording (further away to pick up more nuances of the sound).

The line or headphone out would be plugged directly into the recording device in the studio, and then fed back to you with monitors so you can get the tone you want setting it at what you usually use recorded, and played back to you at a higher volume. The monitors are just used like an extra amp to get a higher amount of volume.

A dummy load is just basically a resistor with the correct resistance to match the ones of your speakers, and sometimes with a line out on it. This is used when speakers are unplugged, and this is plugged in instead otherwise the amp would blow something up without it having a load to dissipate all the amplified power through.

(As far as i know anyway.)

Doug

Visit my band's website!


   
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(@uninvited)
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thx joe for the useful imformation...i ll try all i've just learned...it s time to practice :D


   
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(@uninvited)
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thx doug for the last useful message ... :wink:


   
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(@forrok_star)
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You really only need one Mic.. I only suggested more Mic's for getting creative with different positions, which gives you different tones in the sound field. I still use an old Gibson Falcon (12 watts, with a attenuator at -4dB's) from time to time depending on the venue. Place a Shure M57 Mic. 22 to 30 degrees off center. It will bring tears to your eye's and a warm glow in your heart, crying blues all night long.

Joe


   
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(@uninvited)
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good idea joe...if i get a good tone at low volume..when i go to studio and mic it to record and when the engineer open the volume of the mic to louder my tone; does the mic louder the buzz,hiss,hum etc while recording..?..but my amp is more noisy at high volumes..so it won't be more than that at lower volume i guess


   
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(@forrok_star)
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If the noise is only when your not playing I don't see a problem, if its making noise when your playing " thats a problem". There's ways of filter the buzz an hum out of the mix. My Question is whats creating the amp to make noise? Is it the amp or something else? Have you tried using a Eq or a Noise gate to remove the noise? I use a combination of things to remove unwanted noise when it makes its way into my signal chain. Part of the reason I use an attenuator on the old Gibson amps is because they have a little Hum when they're not being used.

I get my tone from my pre-amp setup which I use a 100 watt tube amp overdriven into a dummy-load, with line level-outs and headphone out. From there I can route the signal anywhere and into anything. Once your set-up and you have your tone all dialed in the sound engineer will know whats needed to clean up the mix.

Joe


   
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(@uninvited)
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i use fender strat..so because of the single magnets it makes noise when i m not playing..at home when i use my digitech rp200's noise gate,it works..but
at higher volumes in studio it still makes noise..also when i plug my SansAmp TRI A.C preamp to FX (send return) stage or direct input,it boost the noise..also my tone becomes so harsh :? ...is there a better way to use preamps with ampli without making the signal so harsh?


   
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(@forrok_star)
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Many guitars with single-coil pickups will benefit from shielding. Here's information and how to. Taming the beast

I've had a couple digitech multi-effects pedals. The first one the guy through it in with some other equipment I bought. I don't remember the model, it was metal and Yellow and sounded great on a few patch's. I gave it away to a friends son to encourage him to practice. The other one is a rp-50 I've only used it a couple times for the built in drums for backing tracks.

Seems to be a common issue with those units. I would try different configurations for the Sans amp. Perhaps connecting the Sans amp to the amps effects return and bypassing the guitar amps input preamp stage. Using just guitar amps power output stage. What about connecting to an equalizer then in to a power amp or the mixer direct. You may need additional equipment like a noise gate or even a compressor. Getting a noise free signal chain can be hard to trouble shoot and clean up sometimes.

joe


   
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(@uninvited)
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well i can't get the "full" sound when i connect direct to mixer or poweramp..i ll try to use my amp's power stage.. is there a diffrence between connecting my digitech by using effects send and return stage or connect directly to amp's input stage..well i don't hear so much diffrence..maybe because i can't turn on the volume :wink:


   
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