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Sickest Possible Guitar Riff Ever.

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Dommy09
(@dommy09)
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Dommy09 - try Buddy Guy, and Jeff Beck. Jimmy Page was heavily influenced by the latter, but Hendrix was influenced by Beck, Guy, and Clapton (even copied Clapton's Bluesbreaker amp and axe setup for a while).

Cheers

"We all have always shared a common belief that music is meant to be played as loud as possible, really raw and raunchy, and I'll punch out anyone who doesn't like it the way I do." -Bon Scott


   
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phillyblues
(@phillyblues)
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Interesting stuff, I think I fall into the category of extremely impressed with the technique and gotta respect the guys abilities (I'll certainly never be able to play like), but can't say the musical style is my cup of tea per se.

As for the Hendrix question, all I can say is that after all these years, the guy's stuff still makes me reach for the old "air guitar" every time. Outside of his pure talent, I will say this though, I do think part of what makes Hendrix's guitar playing status so legendary are his songs' popularity and appeal to both guitarists and non-guitarists alike (ie. there are plenty of technically amazing guitarists out there that other guitarists say "wow" while the average listener just says "huh" and vis-a-versa). Also, his tunes so heavily features the guitar so you can't help but be impressed by it where in other great bands the guitar may not be the center piece of the song so the average listener may really not have an appreciation for how amazing the guitar work is.


   
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jwmartin
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And Wes...................mayn. :shock: That Hendrix cut! :shock: :shock: There I was all "yup, I know my music, I've got this whole music history down pat, people should listen to my suggestions..." Then you post. Frank Black. Hendrix. Hendrix I haven't heard. Uh huh, Hendrix I haven't heard. :shock: :shock: Wassup wit dat?!?

You need to get the whole album "First Rays of the New Rising Sun", the album he was working on when he died. Check out the songs "Hey Baby (New Rising Sun)" (probably my absolute favorite Hendrix song), "Night Bird Flying", "Room Full of Mirrors", "Straight Ahead" and "Earth Blues"

Bass player for Undercover


   
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BmanCV-60
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I went through a Malmsteen phase back in the '80s as I could feel he was trying to do something differnt with the classical twist. I love guys with technical ability but really appreciate the ones who have more to say than "I'm really very fast" (Steve Howe, anyone? ) :)

A lot of bluesy classic rockers didn't start out that way, for some its a progression. For me its just coming full circle and loving the way an electric guitar sounds when its played well.

"...I don't know - but whasomever I do, its gots ta be FUNKY!"


   
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Rahul
(@rahul)
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I would rather see Buckethead. Atleast he's a got a fancy bucket which makes him so irresistible to watch.


   
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MetallicaMan
(@metallicaman)
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Topic starter  

Wow so theres no one here gonna step up to the plate and admit there just a straight up soloist? Come on. I am being cornered here. :lol:

You have any idea how many people out there live for neo-classical shred, or arpeggiated sweeping technique? I am a technique guy. I love how DIFFICULT it is. When you learn some sick e phygian mode scale up and down fast as hell you dont want to go back. Dont get me wrong, blues is definatly the king of feel good solos. And I hate people that just shred up and down up and down. It all about WHICH notes you stop on to bend, which notes need to build in speed, when an arpeggio is needed in the simple rythemic background, ect.

I cant believe everyone here are hendrix freaks. Somebody step up, im out here on my own!

Sing Me A Song Your a Singer, Do me a wrong, your a bringer of evil. - Dio


   
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Wes Inman
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MetallicaMan

No doubt about it Yngwie is a Master guitar player. I can understand easily why people who want to be expert technicians on the guitar would love his playing. He can do it all.

But far and away, most people are really listeners. They simply love great songs. The vast majority of people could care less how difficult the guitar (or any other instrument) is. They want to hear a good groove, a great melody, soulful vocals, etc....
In fact, I think most people dislike complicated music. I prefer simple music myself, something I can follow. When a musician is too flashy it seems to take away from the song to me. I quit listening to the music and focus on the guy running all over the guitar.

So not bashing the guy, he can really play. But the difference between him and someone like Hendrix is huge. Hendrix didn't just play the guitar, he actually painted a picture with his music. Go back and listen to that song Astro Man. It is a song about a super-hero. Now listen to the opening guitar riff. It is the type of riff you hear in old sci-fi movies. Listen to his hits like Machine Gun and you can actually hear the machine guns, jets roaring overhead, and bombs and missles falling. Listen to This May Be Love when Hendrix opens with the word "waterfall". Listen and you can actually hear the waterfall through Jimi's playing.

Listen how the guitar gently flows, it sounds just like water. This is what the shredders lack. I don't know of any shredder that actually captures the essence of the song like this. Sorry, I just don't. :(

Yeah, Yngwie plays lots of classical melodies, but there is not the feeling there. My daughter has been playing piano for a few years now and we always have Bach, Mozart and other famous music playing. Those songs have a lot of feeling. I don't get that from these shredders.

Believe it or not, Hendrix was a huge fan of classical music and was always playing the greats. But he got what these shredders do not, he realized that the music itself had to emote the feelings of the subject matter. Maybe you do not know what I am talking about. And this is why I think he had the greatest technique of all electric guitar players, I cannot think of any guitar player that could even come close to creating the feelings Hendrix did with guitar.

Music is not just a bunch of notes. Great music has to have emotion.

If you know something better than Rock and Roll, I'd like to hear it - Jerry Lee Lewis


   
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GrungeSunset
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Wow so theres no one here gonna step up to the plate and admit there just a straight up soloist? Come on. I am being cornered here. :lol:

You have any idea how many people out there live for neo-classical shred, or arpeggiated sweeping technique? I am a technique guy. I love how DIFFICULT it is. When you learn some sick e phygian mode scale up and down fast as hell you dont want to go back. Dont get me wrong, blues is definatly the king of feel good solos. And I hate people that just shred up and down up and down. It all about WHICH notes you stop on to bend, which notes need to build in speed, when an arpeggio is needed in the simple rythemic background, ect.

I cant believe everyone here are hendrix freaks. Somebody step up, im out here on my own!

It varies for what mood I am in, and the guitarist. Often I find difficult guitar playing fun to watch but not to listen to. Had that happen with Stevie Ray Vaughan. Now Steve Vai on the other hand, awesome to watch and listen to. Like this:

*

*He doesn't start shredding until about 5 minutes in, but I enjoyed the whole thing.

His slower stuff isn't all that different from the Hendrix stuff, but different enough to be a breath of fresh air for me.

"In what, twisted universe does mastering Eddie Van Halen's two handed arpeggio technique count as ABSOLUTELY NOTHING?!" - Dr Gregory House


   
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Scrybe
(@scrybe)
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jwmartin,

cheers for that fam, don't suppose you know if it is available commercially anywhere? or is it more of a hunt-down-bootleg thing? I have a few LPs that were released as Hendrix 'things' but mostly cuts from before he hit with the Experience. The other stuff I have is woodstock, the studio albs, band of gypsys at the filmore, south saturn delta, and the blues alb. oh, and that 3-disc voodoo chile comp (mix of studio cuts and live cuts).

and Wes, I think there's one guitarist who can stand toe-to-toe with Hendrix, and it'd be Jeff Beck -

(and maybe also SRV doin' Tin Pan Alley or I Aint Gonna Give Up On Love)

but seriously, that suggested listening list would get serious consideration, if you're willing..... :wink:

Ra Er Ga.

Ninjazz have SuperChops.

http://www.blipfoto.com/Scrybe


   
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Wes Inman
(@wes-inman)
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Joined: 19 years ago
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Scrybe

I actually agree with you, I have long thought that Jeff Beck probably has the "best" technique bar none. He doesn't do the sound effect thing like Hendrix, but he is absolutely pristine at all times.

And I don't want to keep going on about Hendrix. He was a big influence, but I like dozens of other guitar players just as much. I just think Hendrix does the "paint the picture of the song" best.

And personally, I would rather hear Stevie Ray play Hendrix than Hendrix. I love Stevie Ray! :twisted:

I appreciate the shredders like Yngwie and Vai, etc.... I study them to see how they play. They have amazing technique. But very few of their songs touch something inside. I think people that are into shredding appreciate the pure amazing technique. But I am into music itself. It has to sound good and move me. I think you know what I mean.

And a player doesn't have to play fancy at all to move me. I have always LOVED the guitar in this song Wicked Game by Chris Isaak, and it is pretty simple.

Honestly, I would rather listen to guitar like this than shredding any day of the week. I wish I could play like this as well! :D

If you know something better than Rock and Roll, I'd like to hear it - Jerry Lee Lewis


   
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gnease
(@gnease)
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Wow so theres no one here gonna step up to the plate and admit there just a straight up soloist? Come on. I am being cornered here. :lol:

You have any idea how many people out there live for neo-classical shred, or arpeggiated sweeping technique? I am a technique guy. I love how DIFFICULT it is. When you learn some sick e phygian mode scale up and down fast as hell you dont want to go back. Dont get me wrong, blues is definatly the king of feel good solos. And I hate people that just shred up and down up and down. It all about WHICH notes you stop on to bend, which notes need to build in speed, when an arpeggio is needed in the simple rythemic background, ect.

Sure we understand it's difficult, but not all of us enjoy listening to it ... so it doesn't matter all that much to us. But it can matter to you. That's fine.

This is just as difficult -- deceptively so, as it's much easier to equate speed with difficulty -- and, more importantly for me, I happen to enjoy the song. So this is the type of instrumental guitar I will have on my iPod or Slacker or Stiletto:

Beck: Declan

and love the rhythm on this

Beck: Blast from the East

To you? Probably nothing but yawns. YMMV.

-=tension & release=-


   
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TimeZone
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Yeah, Yngwie plays lots of classical melodies, but there is not the feeling there. My daughter has been playing piano for a few years now and we always have Bach, Mozart and other famous music playing. Those songs have a lot of feeling. I don't get that from these shredders.

This is part of my deal with Yngwie too. I've found that some of his stuff I would like much better if he slowed it down a bit. Like when he's playing, all I usually hear is "dat-dat-dat-dat-dat" really really fast, and with not a whole lot of variation in things like pick attack / timing / etc (ie all the stuff that contributes to "feel"). I've listened to some of his stuff (and tried to play some of his stuff) slowed way down and I realize, "hey, that is actually pretty musical, sounds good", but most of the time when he plays it, it's so darn fast I can't even hear the musicality. All I hear is the speed. Which, to me, is rather boring. Impressive, yes, but not particularly inspiring to listen to (for me).

TZ


   
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jwmartin
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cheers for that fam, don't suppose you know if it is available commercially anywhere?

I think I bought it on iTunes. Here it is on Amazon.com

Bass player for Undercover


   
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slejhamer
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Wow so theres no one here gonna step up to the plate and admit there just a straight up soloist? Come on. I am being cornered here. :lol:

You dared to admit you like a shredder. It happens every time; someone else comments that Hendrix is better and then the flower children rise up and start bashing all shredders when they certainly haven't heard all shredders. Don't let it get you down. :wink:

"Everybody got to elevate from the norm."


   
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gnease
(@gnease)
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Joined: 19 years ago
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Wow so theres no one here gonna step up to the plate and admit there just a straight up soloist? Come on. I am being cornered here. :lol:

You dared to admit you like a shredder. It happens every time; someone else comments that Hendrix is better and then the flower children rise up and start bashing all shredders when they certainly haven't heard all shredders. Don't let it get you down. :wink:

Most of the flower children are very familiar with shredders, as they've been with us a long time. The classic who's better used to be John McLaughlin versus Carlos Santana for fast versus emotional. Everyone chose their man, even while Carlos and John supposedly were close friends, and Carlos nursed his "I'm slow" inferiority complex. And then there's Al Dimeola and all those lost years he treated us to blazing, but annoying mutola technique. Holdsworth, Lukather ... though to be fair, most of these shredders did show another side now and then.

-=tension & release=-


   
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